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.m. eastern. >> the white house national economic council director discusses the fiscal cliff on monday and emphasizes the administration's position on higher taxes for the wealthy. he spoke at a center for american progress forum titled investing in the future, higher education, innovation and american competitiveness. this is 40 minutes. >> it is my great privilege to introduce gene sperling, director of the white house national economic council and assistant the president for economic policy. gene sperling also is a former senior fellow at the center for american progress, pro-growth progressive. and the connection between innovation, education, ensuring we have an economy that works for everyone. i want to say having served in the administration, there is no one in the administration who is more focused on america's long-term competitiveness, short term competitiveness, midterm competitiveness, when the president is talking about issues which are critical to him, america maintains its edges in the global economy, and all of its citizens to students to people dreaming about being the
. the debate rahs ling over on the fiscal cliff, if you raised all the dollars and taxes proposed, you only get $31 billion in a year, and they're requesting more than what we'd even get from that. so we need to be good stewards. yes, we want movement, yes, we want it to work right. before we make an investment again, shouldn't we review the business plan? secondly is an issue that mr. denham raised. this was put before the california voters. yes, it looks different today. as a california voter, i personally think you'd have to go back to the california because it's not what was proposed. it said there'd be private funding. there is no proposed private funding as of today. there's no money in, and i question whether it'll be in the future. so does the federal government -- is the federal government now on the hook for the rest of the plan which the voters were asked for and said would come? if we are the biggest funders of this, why would we not -- [inaudible] to what they said they would do? that is a question we all have to do. thirdly, when you read the business plan and you live in my area,
things done. not limited to just worry about the debt and fiscal cliff and such. our program today just loosely, i'm welcoming you, obviously, joan walker's going the talk, ed reilly of sgi is going the give the polling results, and then ron brownstein of national journal is going to do our interview, and then we're going to have a panel discussion. so it's going to be a full and absolutely terrific day, i think. please, turn these babies off. and, again, welcome you. let me introduce joan walker. joan is executive vice president of allstate which is one of the country's largest insurance, we're in good hands with allstate, we all grew up with that. joan has been a terrific partner, in the last four years she's responsible for all corporate relations with allstate. prior to joining that company in 2005, she did similar work with monsanto and qwest. she is a consummate marketing and communications strategist which, of course, in this town of washington is really all about. so, joan, thank you very much, and we want to welcome our friends here. [applause] >> good morning, and thank you so
. and we face a multitude of problems from abroad. the u.s. fiscal cliff, the slowing growth in china, above all the eurozone now in recession. people know that there are no quick fixes to these problems, but they want to know that we are making progress, and the message from today's autumn statement is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we're getting there, and britain is on the right track. >> will the chancellor resume his seat. now, look, let's be clear about this. the house knows well enough by now that i will afford a very full opportunity for questioning of the chancellor. but the more interruption, the greater the noise, the longer the session will take, and that cannot be right. so i appeal to members, please, to give the chancellor a courteous hearing as, indeed, if it becomes necessary i will appeal to government back benches to afford a fair hearing to the shadow chancellor. that's how it should be. the chancellor. >> mr. speaker, britain is on the right track, and turning back now would be a disaster. we have much more to do. the deficit has fallen by a q
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4